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Many Medical Records Lost in Katrina Flooding

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Many Medical Records Lost in Katrina Flooding

Health Care

Many Medical Records Lost in Katrina Flooding

Many Medical Records Lost in Katrina Flooding

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Victims of Katrina face more headaches: some evacuated but their medical records did not, and they may have been destroyed. Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt says Katrina highlights the need for computerized medical records.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Even if they're covered by Medicaid or private insurance, some victims of Katrina face another headache. They evacuated, but their medical records did not and may have been destroyed. The federal government is aiming to get most medical records computerized within the next decade. For now, it's so expensive few doctors' offices do make computer copies, including ones in Katrina's path, meaning many evacuees now have to re-create their medical histories as best they can.

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