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Terrorism in Southeast Asia: The Philippines

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Terrorism in Southeast Asia: The Philippines

Terrorism in Southeast Asia: The Philippines

Terrorism in Southeast Asia: The Philippines

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4856416/4856417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Philippine Army troops man a roadblock outside Zamboanga, on the southern island of Mindanao, checking vehicles for guns and explosives. Michael Sullivan, NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan, NPR

Philippine Army troops man a roadblock outside Zamboanga, on the southern island of Mindanao, checking vehicles for guns and explosives.

Michael Sullivan, NPR

Analysts say renegade elements of the al Qaeda-linked group Jemaah Islamiyah who have fled a crackdown in Indonesia are turning up in the Muslim region of the southern Philippines. They appear to be forming new alliances with homegrown groups — which could lead to larger, more lethal terrorist attacks.

The Philippines is no stranger to international terrorism. Osama Bin Laden's brother-in-law, Mohammad Jamal Khalifa began developing a network there in the early 1990s, which included the Abu Sayyaf group. Other groups — some bent on achieving independence for Muslim-dominated areas in the south — have also been active.

Michael Sullivan has the second of a series of reports on efforts to combat terrorism in Southeast Asia.