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The Future of U.S. Involvement in Iraq

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The Future of U.S. Involvement in Iraq

Iraq

The Future of U.S. Involvement in Iraq

The Future of U.S. Involvement in Iraq

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4857786/4857787" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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U.S. Army and Iraqi soldiers conduct a security patrol in the northern Iraqi town of Tal Afar, in this military handout photo taken September 11, 2005 and released September 18, 2005. hide caption

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More than two years after the invasion of Iraq — and with Katrina recovery demanding more resources at home — some argue that it's time to bring the troops home. Others counter that there's no alternative but to stay the course.

Guests:

Bassam Sebti, correspondent for The Washington Post

John Mearsheimer, political science professor at the University of Chicago. Author of The Tragedy of Great Power Politics.

Helena Cobban, contributor to The Christian Science Monitor

William Kristol, editor of The Weekly Standard