Capturing Emotion on Film in Katrina's Wake The Washington Post recently published a haunting image of New Orleans street cleaner Dwanda Tyler on its front page last Saturday. Noah Adams speaks with the photographer, Ricky Carioti, about this image and the challenge of capturing tragedy on film.
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Capturing Emotion on Film in Katrina's Wake

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Capturing Emotion on Film in Katrina's Wake

Capturing Emotion on Film in Katrina's Wake

Capturing Emotion on Film in Katrina's Wake

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Washington Post photographer Ricky Carioti's picture of Dwanda Tyler. Rick Carioti/The Washington Post hide caption

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Rick Carioti/The Washington Post

Washington Post photographer Ricky Carioti's picture of Dwanda Tyler.

Rick Carioti/The Washington Post

Photographs documenting Hurricane Katrina's devastation float through cyberspace — and each day, out of thousands to choose from, one arrives at your doorstep on the front page of the newspaper.

Last Saturday, The Washington Post published a picture on its front page that would not be easy to forget.

A young black woman named Dwanda Tyler was part of a crew cleaning the streets of New Orleans after the storm and flood. She wears a blue shirt, with a kerchief covering her hair and a protective mask pushed up on her forehead.

She gazes directly into the lens of the camera, and directly at photographer Ricky Carioti — and the look on her face reflects a number of emotions. He talks about his photo with Noah Adams.