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Capturing Emotion on Film in Katrina's Wake

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Capturing Emotion on Film in Katrina's Wake

Art & Design

Capturing Emotion on Film in Katrina's Wake

Capturing Emotion on Film in Katrina's Wake

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4859253/4859254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Washington Post photographer Ricky Carioti's picture of Dwanda Tyler. Rick Carioti/The Washington Post hide caption

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Rick Carioti/The Washington Post

Washington Post photographer Ricky Carioti's picture of Dwanda Tyler.

Rick Carioti/The Washington Post

Photographs documenting Hurricane Katrina's devastation float through cyberspace — and each day, out of thousands to choose from, one arrives at your doorstep on the front page of the newspaper.

Last Saturday, The Washington Post published a picture on its front page that would not be easy to forget.

A young black woman named Dwanda Tyler was part of a crew cleaning the streets of New Orleans after the storm and flood. She wears a blue shirt, with a kerchief covering her hair and a protective mask pushed up on her forehead.

She gazes directly into the lens of the camera, and directly at photographer Ricky Carioti — and the look on her face reflects a number of emotions. He talks about his photo with Noah Adams.