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Panel Points to Perpetrators of Srebrenica Massacre

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Panel Points to Perpetrators of Srebrenica Massacre

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Panel Points to Perpetrators of Srebrenica Massacre

Panel Points to Perpetrators of Srebrenica Massacre

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A Bosnian Serb commission says it has identified more than 17,000 Serb soldiers who took part in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre. The massacre has been described as the worst war crime in Europe since World War II.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

The massacre 10 years ago in Srebrenica, Bosnia, has been described as the worst war crime in Europe since World War II. Over several days in the summer of 1995, up to 8,000 Muslim men and boys were systematically slaughtered. Now a Bosnian government panel says it has identified more than 17,000 Serb soldiers who took part in the operation. Back in 1993, Srebrenica had been declared a UN safe haven, but on July 11th, 1995, Srebrenica fell to Serb forces. Men and boys were separated from women and girls, then hauled away and shot. Some were tortured and mutilated. The special Bosnian Serb Working Group has spent two years tracking down the names of those responsible. At a news conference yesterday, the panel said the names will be turned over to the state prosecutor's office for review and possible charges.

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