NPR logo

Viewing What Remains in the Ninth Ward

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4947437/4947438" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Viewing What Remains in the Ninth Ward

Katrina & Beyond

Viewing What Remains in the Ninth Ward

Viewing What Remains in the Ninth Ward

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4947437/4947438" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Left to right: Fred Johnson of the New Orleans Neighborhood Development Foundation; Charice Harrison-Nelson, schoolteacher and Ninth Ward resident; and John Scully, New Orleans real estate agent and Ninth Ward landlord. Steve Inskeep, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Steve Inskeep, NPR

Left to right: Fred Johnson of the New Orleans Neighborhood Development Foundation; Charice Harrison-Nelson, schoolteacher and Ninth Ward resident; and John Scully, New Orleans real estate agent and Ninth Ward landlord.

Steve Inskeep, NPR

Hurricane Katrina left the Ninth Ward as one of the worst hit neighborhoods of New Orleans. Residents were mostly working poor and black. Steve Inskeep tours the area with three people who have returned to salvage what they can.

"There's so much devastation that I can't even find [my] property," says John Scully, who owned houses all over the city that were destroyed. The scene is particularly devastating for residents such as Charice Harrison-Nelson, who grew up in New Orleans and vows to stay and rebuild.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.