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How to Fight Rising Home Heating Costs

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How to Fight Rising Home Heating Costs

How to Fight Rising Home Heating Costs

How to Fight Rising Home Heating Costs

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  • Transcript

The price of natural gas running through meters this winter will be much higher than it was last year. iStockphoto hide caption

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Natural gas prices have more than doubled since last year. Homeowners can expect to see, on average, a 50-percent increase in their bills this winter.

Renee Montagne talks to Steven Nadel, executive director of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, about what homeowners can do to save on their heating bills.

Energy-Saving Steps:

  • Turn your water heater to the warm setting (120 degrees Fahrenheit).
  • Make sure your water heater has an insulating blanket.
  • Consider replacing incandescent lights with compact fluorescents (CFLs), which can save three-quarters of the electricity used by incandescents.
  • Check the age and condition of your major appliances, especially the refrigerator. You may want to replace it with a more energy-efficient model before it dies.
  • Clean or replace furnace, air-conditioner, and heat-pump filters.
  • Rope caulk very leaky windows.
  • Collect your utility bills. Separate electricity and fuel bills. Target the biggest bill for energy conservation remedies.
  • Insulate hot water pipes and ducts wherever they run through unheated areas.
  • Seal up the largest air leaks in your house -- the ones that whistle on windy days, or feel drafty. The worst culprits are usually not windows and doors. They're utility cut-throughs for pipes, gaps around chimneys, gaps around recessed lights in insulated ceilings or unfinished spaces behind cupboards and closets.
  • Install a clock thermostat thermostat to lower the heat automatically at night.
  • Schedule an energy audit (ask your utility company or state energy office) for more expert advice on your home as a whole.

Source: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy