'Paradise Now' Is a Life-and-Death Drama

Lubna Azabal as Suha and Kasi Nashef as Said. Credit: Seamus Murphy. Paradise Now BV. i i

hide captionLubna Azabal as Suha (background) and Kasi Nashef as Said (foreground). The romantic tension between the two is only one of the dramatic ingredients in this story of would-be suicide bombers.

Seamus Murphy/Paradise Now BV
Lubna Azabal as Suha and Kasi Nashef as Said. Credit: Seamus Murphy. Paradise Now BV.

Lubna Azabal as Suha (background) and Kasi Nashef as Said (foreground). The romantic tension between the two is only one of the dramatic ingredients in this story of would-be suicide bombers.

Seamus Murphy/Paradise Now BV

Paradise Now is a powerful and provocative drama about the nightmare of terrorism. It gets its strength from its dispassion. It is uncompromising in its determination to explain, rather than justify, incomprehensible acts.

Palestinian-born director Hany Abu-Assad has the nerve and skill to turn daily headlines about suicide bombers into a heart-stopping story whose urgency is startling.

You may think you'll be seeing Paradise Now for its relevance, but its life-and-death drama is what will keep you transfixed.

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