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Baltimore Schools Aim Algebra Class at Parents

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Baltimore Schools Aim Algebra Class at Parents

Education

Baltimore Schools Aim Algebra Class at Parents

Baltimore Schools Aim Algebra Class at Parents

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In Maryland, the current class of 9th graders will be the first to have to pass an algebra test to graduate from high school. That's putting pressure on some parents to brush up on their math skills so that they can help their children. Baltimore County's school system has recognized this potential problem and is now offering classes to bring parents up to speed on algebra.

The school system is offering its algebra awareness class for parents in a three-session format. Each session is two hours long.

The idea came from discussions of the new algebra requirement at Parent-Teacher Association meetings last year.

In addition to algebra, the class of 2009 must also pass tests covering English, biology and government to graduate.

The algebra classes for parents have gotten such good reviews that Baltimore County's Board of Education is considering offering them again next semester.

To test your algebra skills, try solving for the variable in these equations:

1. 3x-8=-6x+5

2. 6(2x-3)=3(x+9)

3. 3x+12=36

4. Write an equation based on this proposition, then solve it. Tickets to the prom are 25.50. If $4,590 is collected from ticket sales, how many tickets were sold?

—————

ANSWERS:

1. x=13/9ths

2. x=5

3. x=8

4a. Equation: 25.50x=4,590

4.b x=180

Learning Differences

University of Connecticut Education Professor Barry G. Sheckley says that the way our brains work, and the way we learn, changes significantly as we move from childhood to adulthood.

Professor Barry G. Sheckley, Interviewed by Allison Keyes

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