'Cavalia': An Equine-Human Ballet The horse's connection to both freedom and power is the driving theme behind a new show, a kind of equine-human ballet called Cavalia. It was created by one of the people behind the renowned Cirque du Soleil.
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'Cavalia': An Equine-Human Ballet

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'Cavalia': An Equine-Human Ballet

'Cavalia': An Equine-Human Ballet

'Cavalia': An Equine-Human Ballet

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4991703/4991715" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The horse's connection to both freedom and power is the driving theme behind a new show, a kind of equine-human ballet called Cavalia.

President and creative director Normand Latourelle started Cavalia — which is an invented word drawing on the French word cheval, or horse — after helping to create the renowned Cirque du Soleil. The show features 47 horses and 32 acrobats and aeralists.

Co-equestrian director, trainer and performer Frederic Pignon grew up near Avignon, France, playing with horses... literally. Frederic Chehu hide caption

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Frederic Chehu

Co-equestrian director, trainer and performer Frederic Pignon grew up near Avignon, France, playing with horses... literally.

Frederic Chehu

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