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'Cavalia': An Equine-Human Ballet

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'Cavalia': An Equine-Human Ballet

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'Cavalia': An Equine-Human Ballet

'Cavalia': An Equine-Human Ballet

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The horse's connection to both freedom and power is the driving theme behind a new show, a kind of equine-human ballet called Cavalia.

President and creative director Normand Latourelle started Cavalia — which is an invented word drawing on the French word cheval, or horse — after helping to create the renowned Cirque du Soleil. The show features 47 horses and 32 acrobats and aeralists.

Co-equestrian director, trainer and performer Frederic Pignon grew up near Avignon, France, playing with horses... literally. Frederic Chehu hide caption

toggle caption Frederic Chehu

Co-equestrian director, trainer and performer Frederic Pignon grew up near Avignon, France, playing with horses... literally.

Frederic Chehu

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