Toll, Rewards of Playing a Slave at Brattonsville

Slave interpreter Kitty Wilson-Evans

Slave interpreter Kitty Wilson-Evans, dressed in 18-century garb, leads tours of the plantation's slave quarters. Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR
A young visitor inspects a slave log cabin at Brattonsville Plantation. i i

A young visitor inspects a slave log cabin at Brattonsville Plantation. Many children exclaim: "It's little!" Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR
A young visitor inspects a slave log cabin at Brattonsville Plantation.

A young visitor inspects a slave log cabin at Brattonsville Plantation. Many children exclaim: "It's little!"

Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR

A small group of African American re-enactors in South Carolina bring the history of slavery to life, playing slaves on the Brattonsville Plantation.

Karen Grigsby Bates talks with one woman about the psychological toll — and unexpected rewards — of playing a slave.

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