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Sixty Years of Trying to Control the Bomb

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Sixty Years of Trying to Control the Bomb

World

Sixty Years of Trying to Control the Bomb

Sixty Years of Trying to Control the Bomb

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4994161/4994162" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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South Korean protesters carrying a mock North Korean missile are blocked by riot policemen at a rally in Seoul, May 4 Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

A meeting of the Executive Committee of the National Security Committee during the Cuban Missile Crisis: President John F. Kennedy, (L) Dean Rusk, and Robert McNamara (R) in the White House Cabinet Room. U.S. National Archives hide caption

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U.S. National Archives

Over six decades, the world has struggled to develop atomic power and control nuclear weapons — with mixed results on both counts. Neal Conan hosts a special broadcast on the history of the atomic age, live from the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C.

Guests:

Richard Rhodes, Historian and author of 20 books; a National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Making of the Atomic Bomb; author of the forthcoming End Game: the Unmaking of the Nuclear Arms Race

Siegfried Hecker, nuclear scientist at Los Alamos since 1965; former director of Los Alamos National Laboratory (1986-1997); visiting professor, Stanford University

General Eugene Habiger, former commander-in-chief of the United States Strategic Command (1996 to 1998); distinguished fellow with the Center for international Trade and Security, University of Georgia

Robert McNamara, former secretary of defense under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson; former president of the World Bank