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Journey Along the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway

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Journey Along the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway

Katrina & Beyond

Journey Along the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway

Journey Along the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway

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All Things Considered begins a journey along the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, through the regions hardest hit by Hurricane Katrina. NPR's Noah Adams is traveling by boat from Pensacola, Fla., into New Orleans, about 180 nautical miles.

Monday, he visits a shipyard in Pensacola where Bill and Barbara Trondle say they have five years of work backed up — because of last year's Hurricane Ivan. Now, they're getting calls from some of the thousands of people whose boats were damaged by Katrina.

Also, at a marina in Orange Beach, Alabama charter boat captains say the fishing's great, but few people are showing up for trips. Would-be customers are saying they've heard the whole Gulf Coast has been destroyed.