A Hot Time at Hades Casino

Satirist Harry Shearer conjures up a commercial for a Las Vegas casino that capitalizes on the proximity to Yucca Mountain, where spent nuclear fuel may soon be stored. "Hades" is a theme casino based on the "going-to-hell" experience.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Nevada's senators are blocking confirmation of the president's choice to oversee nuclear waste disposal at Yucca Mountain. And earlier this month, another sign of trouble for the facility: The Energy Department's inspector general raised questions about the quality of the work at the site. Well, satirist Harry Shearer suggests Nevada should stop fretting and turn the whole thing into entertainment.

HARRY SHEARER: (As Announcer #1) Ladies and gentlemen, you are invited to the grand opening of the biggest thing to hit the Nevada desert since topless Starbucks. Welcome to Hades.

(As Wayne Newton) Hi, everybody. I'm Wayne Newton, and I've taken the short drive from Vegas to Yucca Mountain's new resort entertainment complex that's half-lives ahead of the competition.

(As Danny Savingsfund(ph)) I'm Danny Savingsfund. When I first had the idea for a Vegas-style resort experience based on hell, I knew Yucca Mountain would be the perfect location, a place where good never felt so bad and evil never was so much fun. Hades had to bring a new concept to the action that's at the heart of the Nevada resort experience, so how's this: a casino where there are no chips? You're playing with little plastic slices of your very own soul. Take it from me, it's a thrill. Plus, there's fine dining at Lucifer's, where all the steaks are charred, and the magnificent Satan's Folly golf course, the 17 most beautiful holes in Nevada.

(As Announcer #2) See you in Hades.

(As Announcer #1) Garrett Tubbs(ph) in the Flaming Laugh Pit through February 9th.

SIEGEL: Satire from Harry Shearer and his program "Le Show."

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