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Scientists Develop Online 'Hug'

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Scientists Develop Online 'Hug'

Scientists Develop Online 'Hug'

Scientists Develop Online 'Hug'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5029132/5029133" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

If you think the Internet is a cheap substitute for real human contact, scientists in Singapore want to help. They're working on a way to transmit a hug online. They've devised a jacket, which they are testing on chickens. On a signal from the Internet, it vibrates, allegedly simulating the touch of a distant owner. Scientists say if it works in people, it could help traveling parents hug their children. And just wait until it's adapted for... other uses.

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