Segregation, 50 Years after Bus Boycott

Rosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Ala. i i

hide captionRosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Ala., after the Supreme Court ruled segregation illegal on the city bus system on Dec. 21, 1956.

Corbis
Rosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Ala.

Rosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Ala., after the Supreme Court ruled segregation illegal on the city bus system on Dec. 21, 1956.

Corbis

It's been 50 years since Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat on a city bus in Montgomery, Ala. The incident sparked the famous bus boycott leading to the eventual demise of legal segregation.

At the time, many believed that the end of legal segregation would lead to greater racial integration on all levels of society. Yet half a century later, racial separation persists in schools, the workplace, and even more so in the communities where people live.

Guests:

Sheryll Cashin, author, The Failures of Integration: How Race and Class are undermining the American Dream; Georgetown University law professor

Alvin Thornton, chairman of Howard University's political science department

Connie Rice, civil rights attorney; co-founder and co-director of the Advancement Project in Los Angeles

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