NPR logo

Study Busts Myth of Inebriated Elephants in Africa

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5056734/5056735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Study Busts Myth of Inebriated Elephants in Africa

Study Busts Myth of Inebriated Elephants in Africa

Study Busts Myth of Inebriated Elephants in Africa

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5056734/5056735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

You may see pink elephants when you are drunk, but scientists say elephants aren't seeing any pink people. That's because the notion of elephants rampaging across the African grass after drinking fermented fruit is a myth. In a study to be published by the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, British researchers say elephants do love the fruit of the Marula tree. But to become tipsy, a pachyderm would have to eat only fermented fruit at the rate of four times his normal consumption. Now Asian elephants simply break into rice wine stores and drink it from the bottle.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.