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The Year in Fashion

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The Year in Fashion

The Year in Fashion

The Year in Fashion

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Writer Najwa Moses reviews what worked and what didn't in the world of style — from diamonds in your teeth to cupcakes with rainbow sprinkles...

FARAI CHIDEYA, host:

One reason celebrities exist is to show mere mortals what style is. Here to remember what worked and what didn't, fashion writer Najwa Moses.

(Soundbite of music)

Unidentified Man: (Rapping) Whatcha gon' do with all that junk? All that junk inside that trunk?

Unidentified Woman: (Rapping) I'm a ge-ge-ge-get you talkin', get you lovin'...

Ms. NAJWA MOSES (Fashion Writer): In 2005, the fashion story was all about eclectic body detail, about being supersized, bootylicious or having a blinged-out grill. If your behind wasn't your best asset, it was OK to divert attention by blinging out your grill--aka, your mouth: with diamonds, platinum or gold, like rappers Paul Wall and Nelly.

(Soundbite of music)

NELLY: (Rapping) See your grill.

Mr. PAUL WALL: (Rapping) You want to see my what?

NELLY: (Rapping) Yeah, your grill. Yeah, your grill.

Mr. WALL: (Rapping) Oh, ...(unintelligible).

Ms. MOSES: Add to this a heaping helping of cheap designer fashion for the rest of us. It started with Isaac Mizrahi at Target; it continued with H&M's romance with Stella McCartney. This was the year high-end designers stepped down and got down with the middle class to give us all what we've always really wanted: big names on the dime.

To most folks, it didn't matter if the cashmere was only 2 percent or mass-produced by wage slave-girl children in China. It's chic, it's designer and I still have my arm and my leg.

For those of us who believe we are the world and can make this a better place, there were handmade, US-grown, one-of-a-kind items like T's. Surge in T-shirt sales this year accounted for $17 billion of the $166 billion fashion market. What? You mean to tell me that your iPod-slash-cell phone-slash-BlackBerry-slash-two-way-slash-RAZR phone can't play music, text your girl, take a picture, capture a video, blast e-mail and allow you to speak all at the same time? Tch. Get with it already. In 2006, it will be able to make your bed, your breakfast and your backache go away.

Just to get out of my own head, I BlackBerry'd a few peeps to see what 2005 trends they loved, hated and wanted to keep. My gay and straight male friends hated the return of the muumuu dress. For the straights, it messed up their booty radar. The gays said it made young women look like Grandpa in drag. Ugh, boots. I personally hate these muffinlike ankle wrappers. I don't care how much fur they stick on 'em, with new hot pink, purple, blue or Disney-inspired theme they paint on them. I want them to go away--away--away.

And same with the taster's accessory for last: the cupcake became the new chic dessert. No matter how big-boned you are or how much testosterone you have, everybody loves a cupcake.

(Soundbite of music)

Unidentified Group: (Rapping) I told you that I'm crazy for these cupcakes 'cause ...(unintelligible). I told you that I'm crazy for these cupcakes 'cause ...(unintelligible).

Ms. MOSES: See you in 2006 and happy new year.

CHIDEYA: Najwa Moses is a writer and cupcake lover living in Brooklyn, New York.

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