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MP3 Workouts

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MP3 Workouts

Digital Life

MP3 Workouts

MP3 Workouts

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Liane Hansen talks to Monica Neave, a certified personal trainer and exercise editor for bellaonline.com about the perks of downloading your workout to an MP3 device.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Today is the first day to work on whatever resolutions you made for the new year. For many of us, more time at the gym is at the top of the 2006 to-do list just as it was last year and the year before that. However, there is electronic help. Due to the invention of the MP3 player and the iPod, working out can sound like this.

(Soundbite of downloaded workout)

Unidentified Woman: And bend, bend, down, down, uh. Oh, yeah. Get your bounce.

HANSEN: From hip-hop yoga to cardio boot camp classes, exercise regimens to suit all shapes and sizes are now downloadable. Monica Neave is a certified personal trainer and exercise editor for BellaOnline.com. We've called her at her home in Tucson, Arizona, to break down the pros and cons of an MP3 workout.

Hi, Monica. Happy new year.

Ms. MONICA NEAVE (Exercise Editor, BellaOnline.com): Happy new year to you.

HANSEN: Tell us more about the kinds of downloadable workouts that are available.

Ms. NEAVE: Well, there's everything from cardio to yoga to strength-training. So it just depends what you're looking for.

HANSEN: Now what are the perks of downloading a workout?

Ms. NEAVE: You can take it with you anywhere. So you can work out at a gym. If you travel for work or for pleasure, you can take it with you on your trips and work out at your gym. You can use them outside, at home, so they're very versatile.

HANSEN: And to a certain extent, it fits right in your pocket and it's just like you're hearing the trainer in your head, right?

Ms. NEAVE: I think that's like the least of it. I think you have a trainer but on top of that you also have really inspiring music and you have the coaching and the motivation, which is awesome, and the guidance, which a lot of people, I think, when they work out on their own, they kind of feel lost and don't really have a set routine and so a lot of people are looking for something more solid.

HANSEN: Now you're a personal trainer. Does this cut in on your business?

Ms. NEAVE: Absolutely not. I encourage my clients to use this because if you think about a client coming in to see you, they're only spending two or three hours a week with you in the gym and the rest of the time you have to trust that they're going to do things on their own which most likely they're not. So I encourage my clients to use these products when they're not with me.

HANSEN: That sounds pretty good. But I'm trying to imagine myself standing on line at the grocery store, or at the bank, looking around and there are people exercising.

Ms. NEAVE: Well, you know, there's moments in every day, there's opportunities all the time. When you think you don't have any time, you know, and you're just waiting around, you can be doing a set of heel raises or something, or stretching your quads, but you don't have to really listen to these products to do that. I mean, it just helps you, I think, to kind of get in a different mind frame that it's not always about being in the gym or, you know, there's always opportunities, and I think it kind of opens up your mind to that.

HANSEN: Monica Neave is the exercise editor for BellaOnline. We reached her on her cell phone in the mountains in Tucson, Arizona. Monica, thanks again. Happy new year.

Ms. NEAVE: Thank you.

(Soundbite of downloaded workout)

Unidentified Woman: Yo! Take it easy. Ouch.

HANSEN: It's 22 minutes before the hour.

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