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Celebrating a Sister's Memory, on Tape
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Celebrating a Sister's Memory, on Tape

Celebrating a Sister's Memory, on Tape

Celebrating a Sister's Memory, on Tape
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5131670/5131677" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Kim Emerson, left, spoke with her friend Gladys Chen.

Kim Emerson, left, spoke with her friend Gladys Chen. StoryCorps hide caption

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The 'Kendra' Case on NPR

Seven years ago, a young woman named Kendra Webdale was killed when a mentally ill man pushed her in front of an oncoming New York City subway train. She died on Jan. 3, 1999.

The case is still in the news, still in the courts, and still very much on the minds of family members. Webdale's sister, Kim Emerson, visited one of the StoryCorps recording booths with a friend to recall her sister — and a cherished reminder of her life.

The Webdale case led to the creation of a new law in New York State — called Kendra's Law — meant to ensure that mentally ill people take the medication they need.

The StoryCorps project records interviews between loved ones and friends from around the country. Each interview is archived at the Library of Congress — and an excerpt airs on Morning Edition each Friday.

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