NPR logo

Born in the '50s: Beliefs, Now and Then

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5148064/5148065" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Born in the '50s: Beliefs, Now and Then

U.S.

Born in the '50s: Beliefs, Now and Then

Born in the '50s: Beliefs, Now and Then

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5148064/5148065" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Judy Carter, left, and Patrick Michaels were both born in 1950, and both have had a change in their thinking in recent decades. JudyCarter.com; Cato Institute hide caption

toggle caption JudyCarter.com; Cato Institute

As Judge Samuel Alito testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Robert Siegel talks with Alito's contemporaries — those who are 55 or so — to see how much they and their views have changed since they were 35. In his testimony, Alito has said his views have changed since 1985.

Siegel talks to Judy Carter, who performs corporate comedy; Patrick Michaels, a University of Virginia professor and a senior fellow at the Cato Institute; Arianna Huffington, editor of the Web site The Huffington Post; Carl Rohde, an entrepreneur and part-time actor from Greenwich, Conn.; and Alan Ito, who works for the California Department of Toxic Substance Control.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.