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New York Gets Serious about Tracking Diabetes

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New York Gets Serious about Tracking Diabetes

Health Care

New York Gets Serious about Tracking Diabetes

New York Gets Serious about Tracking Diabetes

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In a few days, New York City begins tracking diabetics' health by requiring most of the city's medical labs to report the results of a blood-glucose test. It will be the first time any level of American government has tracked a chronic disease, as opposed to infectious ones. Guests take a closer look at New York's new program and how diabetes affects some groups, such as Native Americans, more acutely.

Guests:

Dr. Thomas Frieden, New York City health commissioner

Craig Vanderwagen, chief medical officer, Indian Health Service

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