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Guilt, Innocence and the Role of DNA Evidence

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Guilt, Innocence and the Role of DNA Evidence

Guilt, Innocence and the Role of DNA Evidence

Guilt, Innocence and the Role of DNA Evidence

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5156413/5156414" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Madeleine Brand discusses the story about DNA test results this week that confirmed the guilt of a Virginia man executed in 1992. Later in Friday's program, she speaks with a filmmaker who documented the lives of seven convicted felons, all of whom were later exonerated by DNA evidence.

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

In Virginia yesterday, DNA tests confirmed that a prisoner executed in 1992 was indeed guilty of his crimes despite his claims of innocence. Roger Keith Coleman's case rekindled the debate about prisoners who may be wrongly convicted. Later on today's program, a new documentary about those prisoners who've been exonerated by DNA technology.

(Soundbite of "After Innocence")

Mr. NICHOLAS YARRIS: I'm one of the strongest human beings ever created. I know that now. And I say that without an ounce of ego because I've paid for it.

BRAND: Stay with us on that story. You're listening to DAY TO DAY from NPR News.

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