NPR logo

Alaskan Volcano Erupts for First Time in 20 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5157019/5157020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Alaskan Volcano Erupts for First Time in 20 Years

U.S.

Alaskan Volcano Erupts for First Time in 20 Years

Alaskan Volcano Erupts for First Time in 20 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5157019/5157020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This is the first major eruption of the Augustine volcano since 1986. Game McGimsey/Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey hide caption

toggle caption
Game McGimsey/Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey

This is the first major eruption of the Augustine volcano since 1986.

Game McGimsey/Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey

A map projects the path of ash fallout from the Augustine volcano. USGS hide caption

toggle caption
USGS

A map projects the path of ash fallout from the Augustine volcano.

USGS

Alaska's Augustine volcano has erupted for the first time in two decades. Local volcanologists are pleased their computer models predicted the event accurately, but as Alaska Public Radio's Annie Feidt reports, they anticipate that the big blast is yet to come.

There's a slight chance each eruption could cause a tsunami, but the primary concern is for air traffic. In 1989, an ash cloud from another Alaskan volcano disabled all four engines of a fully loaded 747 en route to Anchorage. The plane plummeted thousands of feet before the pilots were able to gain control and land safely.

Scientists are also worried about possible ash fall in communities across the most populated parts of Alaska. Ash fall can cause respiratory problems.