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Many L.A. Homeless Seek Affluent Areas

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Many L.A. Homeless Seek Affluent Areas

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Many L.A. Homeless Seek Affluent Areas

Many L.A. Homeless Seek Affluent Areas

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5173512/5173570" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Clarence Smith, 65, has slept in a park in Beverly Hills and store doorways for the past five years. "It's not too bad. People bring me food," he says. "I saw Marlon Brando drive by one time. You know, the Godfather?" Mandalit del Barco, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mandalit del Barco, NPR

Clarence Smith, 65, has slept in a park in Beverly Hills and store doorways for the past five years. "It's not too bad. People bring me food," he says. "I saw Marlon Brando drive by one time. You know, the Godfather?"

Mandalit del Barco, NPR

German Flores lives in the Malibu canyon, sleeping in a pup tent after long days working as a gardener and day laborer for the rich Malibu residents. "It's peaceful and beautiful here," he says, "so far away from people, no one bothers me. Mandalit del Barco, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mandalit del Barco, NPR

German Flores lives in the Malibu canyon, sleeping in a pup tent after long days working as a gardener and day laborer for the rich Malibu residents. "It's peaceful and beautiful here," he says, "so far away from people, no one bothers me.

Mandalit del Barco, NPR

Los Angeles County may be the homeless capital of America. Now, a new study shows that thousands of homeless people are avoiding crime-plagued areas like L.A.'s skid row and seeking better, safer lives in affluent neighborhoods away from the city.

Mandalit del Barco profiles some of the homeless people who live in the shadow of Southern California's most affluent areas.

Homeless Population Study

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