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Urinal Vandal, or New Artiste?

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Urinal Vandal, or New Artiste?

Urinal Vandal, or New Artiste?

Urinal Vandal, or New Artiste?

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An appeals court in Paris may soon have to actually answer the generally rhetorical question: But is it art? Pierre Pinoncelli was convicted of vandalizing one of the famous urinals signed by Dadaist artist Marcel Duchamp. He plans to appeal, arguing that when he scratched and scrawled on the urinal, he created a new, original piece of art. Pinoncelli told a judge his act was a "wink at Dadaism" which was about a "lack of respect" even for its own art.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A French court may soon have to answer the generally rhetorical question, but is it art? Pierre Pinoncelli was convicted of vandalizing one of the famous urinals signed by Dada's artist, Marcel Duchamp. He plans to appeal, arguing that when he scratched and scrawled on the urinal, he created a new original piece of art. Pinoncelli told the judge, Dadaism is about a lack of respect, even for its own art.

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