Friedan's Push Helped Women Find Equal Footing

Betty Friedan at the UN World Conference on Women, held in Beijing in 1995. i

Betty Friedan at the UN World Conference on Women, held in Beijing in 1995. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images
Betty Friedan at the UN World Conference on Women, held in Beijing in 1995.

Betty Friedan at the UN World Conference on Women, held in Beijing in 1995.

Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Betty Friedan's 1963 book The Feminine Mystique helped drive the modern women's movement. The author and activist died Saturday of congestive heart failure. She was 85. Harvard historian Nancy Cott discusses Friedan's legacy with Debbie Elliott.

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