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Bruckheimer Film Moves Ahead in New Orleans
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Bruckheimer Film Moves Ahead in New Orleans

Katrina & Beyond

Bruckheimer Film Moves Ahead in New Orleans

Bruckheimer Film Moves Ahead in New Orleans
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Film producer Jerry Bruckheimer's latest project is back on in New Orleans. Louisiana tax benefits lured filmmakers back after Katrina delayed an October start. The storyline will use the storm, with locations including the Lower Ninth Ward.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

For the first time since Hurricane Katrina, shooting is scheduled to start today for a major movie in New Orleans. It's called Déjà Vu. The cast includes Denzel Washington and Val Kilmer.

The film was originally going to begin production in October. The hurricane prompted director Tony Scott to look for alternate locations, until he realized that he could work with the storm's devastation.

Mr. TONY SCOTT (Film Director): We adapted the script to, you know, to after Katrina. And we're shooting in the bayou, we're shooting in the French Quarter, we're shooting in the Ninth Ward. It's a perfect background, and for me it's a third character in the movie.

INSKEEP: The opening of Déjà Vu will now incorporate Mardi Gras. The producer, Jerry Bruckheimer, says the film will show a recovering city.

Mr. JERRY BRUCKHEIMER (Film Producer): You're all going to see that the beauty of New Orleans is still here and that it hasn't been touched by the hurricane. And let people know that it's, you know, it's safe to come back here and enjoy the beauty of the state and the city.

INSKEEP: New Orleans has been the setting for classics such as The Big Easy, of course, and A Streetcar Named Desire.

Aside from the city's aesthetic qualities, producers like Bruckheimer keep coming back to the area because of the generous tax incentives that Louisiana gives to filmmakers.

Mr. BRUCKHEIMER: Hollywood is always trying to save money and make pictures for less. And so, you know, if they encourage you to come here, you want to come here. Plus, we love this city.

INSKEEP: Bruckheimer says the biggest concern about shooting in New Orleans now is whether the city's infrastructure can handle a large cast and crew.

Mr. BRUCKHEIMER: We need all the city services to help us make the movie and, you know, if everything's working and there's no health concerns, electricity concerns, all those kind of issues.

INSKEEP: After visiting New Orleans, Bruckheimer decided the city could handle production. That's a sentiment apparently not shared by the makers of a movie about Hurricane Katrina.

According to a Hong Kong newspaper, the 50 million dollar production will mostly be shot in New York.

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