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The Risks and Rewards of War Reporting

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The Risks and Rewards of War Reporting

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The Risks and Rewards of War Reporting

The Risks and Rewards of War Reporting

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The dangers of reporting in wartime are highlighted when one reporter is kidnapped and two more badly injured in a roadside attack. But reporters covering conflicts have always had to calculate the risks of bringing a story home

Guests:

Donatella Lorch, former national correspondent for Newsweek; was in Afghanistan for a week (Dec. 29-Jan 5) for Newsweek, covered the Gulf War for The New York Times

David Turnley, former Detroit Free Press staff photographer from 1980 to 1998; currently a staff photographer for Getty Images; he's documented South Africa and covered the Gulf War, revolutions in Eastern Europe, the student uprising in China and the disintegration of the Soviet Union

Joe Galloway, co-author of the best-selling book, We Were Soldiers Once... and Young; military affairs correspondent for Knight Ridder; served three tours in Vietnam for UPI, beginning in early 1965; he's the only civilian to have been awarded the Bronze Star by the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War