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The New Brinksmanship: Iran's Nuclear Threat
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The New Brinksmanship: Iran's Nuclear Threat

The New Brinksmanship: Iran's Nuclear Threat

The New Brinksmanship: Iran's Nuclear Threat
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5196002/5196019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Joseph Cirincione

Joseph Cirincione is an expert on nuclear and biological weapons. CEIP hide caption

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A map highlights Iran's efforts to mine and enrich uranium -- and build reactors. i

A map highlights Iran's efforts to mine and enrich uranium -- and build reactors. 'Deadly Arsenals' - Carnegie Endowment hide caption

toggle caption 'Deadly Arsenals' - Carnegie Endowment
A map highlights Iran's efforts to mine and enrich uranium -- and build reactors.

A map highlights Iran's efforts to mine and enrich uranium -- and build reactors.

'Deadly Arsenals' - Carnegie Endowment

Iran's attempts to restart its nuclear program in defiance of the International Atomic Energy Agency is a game of nuclear chicken, says Joseph Cirincione, the director for non-proliferation at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Cirincione specializes in defense and proliferation issues at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He is the senior associate and director of the Non-Proliferation Project.

Books Featured In This Story

Deadly Arsenals

Nuclear, Biological And Chemical Threats

by Joseph Cirincione, Jon B. Wolfsthal and Miriam Rajkumar

Paperback, 490 pages |

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Deadly Arsenals
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Nuclear, Biological And Chemical Threats
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