Sitting at Home, Searching for Stardust

In this photo, particles shot into aerogel at high velocities leave carrot-shaped trails in the subs i

Particles shot into aerogel -- a sort of stiff, semi-transparent gel -- at high velocities leave carrot-shaped trails in the substance. NASA hide caption

itoggle caption NASA
In this photo, particles shot into aerogel at high velocities leave carrot-shaped trails in the subs

Particles shot into aerogel -- a sort of stiff, semi-transparent gel -- at high velocities leave carrot-shaped trails in the substance.

NASA

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Berkeley researchers are seeking volunteers to help identify dust from distant stars swept up by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. Using a web-based software program — a "virtual microscope" — volunteers will help scan 1.5 million pictures for tracks left by speeding dust.

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