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Cash Gets Kids Out of Gym Class

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Cash Gets Kids Out of Gym Class

Education

Cash Gets Kids Out of Gym Class

Cash Gets Kids Out of Gym Class

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A gym teacher in Escambia County, Florida, let his middle school students skip class if they paid him a dollar. Though many are defending him as a popular teacher, his "shakedown" allegedly netted $30,000.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Don't skip gym class, kids, it'll cost you. At least it used to in Mr. Braxton's class at the Ernest Ward Middle School in Escambia County, Florida. Officials there say that phys ed teacher Terrence Braxton permitted students to cut his class if they paid him a dollar. The teacher's accused of collecting more than a thousand dollars over three months.

Mr. Braxton, who earned around $30,000 a year, is charged with six counts of bribery. Despite shaking down his students, Mr. Braxton was considered a popular teacher and the basketball coach who turned around a losing team. Principal Nancy Gindle Perry(ph) told the Washington Post the basketball team had lost every game for five years. This year we only lost two games, and they were only by two points. He had a very good rapport with the kids. It's just sad. Our troubled young kids, he could reach them. Yeah, allegedly, clear into their pockets.

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