NPR logo

Bob Brozman's Influences, Now and Then

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5226980/5226985" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Bob Brozman's Influences, Now and Then

Bob Brozman's Influences, Now and Then

Bob Brozman's Influences, Now and Then

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5226980/5226985" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Set List

  • "Mama Done Told Me"

For guitarist Bob Brozman, the blues were his ticket to a world of music. It was the music that drew him into playing as a child, he says. His latest album, Blues Reflex, is a return to that initial influence.

In addition to blues, Bob Brozman plays guitar in many styles: Calypso, ragtime, Hawaiian, Indian, African and Japanese, to name a few. hide caption

toggle caption

But over the years, Brozman has acquired a wealth of inspiration, as he traveled the world to appreciate differing musical traditions. From songs of Hawaii and Reunion Island to calypso, he finds patterns of similarity — and difference.

Those patterns are often expressed in Brozman's collaborations with native musicians. For 2005's Songs of the Volcano, for instance, the guitarist recorded with five string-bands of Papua New Guinea. The project also inspired a short film, included with the CD.

Related NPR Stories

Web Resources