After the Flood, It's Farewell to Bucktown

White-bearded Frank Wooley, a retired commercial fisherman, on his boat. i i

Frank Wooley, a retired commercial fisherman, keeps his boat in Bucktown, but he's losing his docking space. Evie Stone, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Evie Stone, NPR
White-bearded Frank Wooley, a retired commercial fisherman, on his boat.

Frank Wooley, a retired commercial fisherman, keeps his boat in Bucktown, but he's losing his docking space.

Evie Stone, NPR

A flood protection project under way in New Orleans will come at the expense of Bucktown, a neighborhood that was home to both the well-known Sid-Mar restaurant and to commercial fishermen. The Army Corps of Engineers plans to build floodgates where Bucktown once stood. The Sid-Mar and other landmarks of the neighborhood were washed away by the storm surge from Hurricane Katrina.

Roland Mollere stands at the bar of R&O's, a restaurant he owns in Bucktown.

Roland Mollere stands at the bar of R&O's, a restaurant he owns in Bucktown. Evie Stone, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Evie Stone, NPR
The 17th St. Canal, with its footbridge, was a Bucktown landmark.

The 17th St. Canal, with its footbridge, was a Bucktown landmark. Fisherman tied their boats to the wooden pilings in the foreground. Evie Stone, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Evie Stone, NPR
Frank Wooley.

Frank Wooley. "All I want," he says, "Is a place to put my boat." Evie Stone, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Evie Stone, NPR

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