Charity Money for Katrina Victims Runs Low Private charities may be running out of money to help victims of Hurricane Katrina. Nonprofits have disbursed about two-thirds of the more than $3 billion they raised for hurricane relief, according to a report in the Washington Post.
NPR logo

Charity Money for Katrina Victims Runs Low

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5234976/5234977" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Charity Money for Katrina Victims Runs Low

Charity Money for Katrina Victims Runs Low

Charity Money for Katrina Victims Runs Low

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5234976/5234977" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Private charities may be running out of money to help victims of Hurricane Katrina. Nonprofits have disbursed about two-thirds of the more than $3 billion they raised for hurricane relief, according to a report in the Washington Post.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

As residents of the Gulf Coast continue to recover, private charities may be running out of money to help them. Non-profits have burned through about two-thirds of the more than three billion dollars they raised for hurricane relief. That's according to today's Washington Post.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

The biggest charity, the Red Cross, has passed on more than 84 percent of its hurricane donations. Now, it is true that the government is expected to spend possibly hundreds of billions of dollars to rebuild the Gulf Coast's infrastructure, but private charities are expected to pay to help bring back the social fabric.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.