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New Orleans a City of Paradoxes During Mardi Gras

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New Orleans a City of Paradoxes During Mardi Gras

Katrina & Beyond

New Orleans a City of Paradoxes During Mardi Gras

New Orleans a City of Paradoxes During Mardi Gras

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5235978/5235979" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of Third Line Productions Traditional New Orleans Jazz Bands dance down Bourbon Street in New Orleans' French Quarter, Feb. 27, 2006. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

Members of Third Line Productions Traditional New Orleans Jazz Bands dance down Bourbon Street in New Orleans' French Quarter, Feb. 27, 2006.

Reuters

In the Lower Ninth ward, the collapsing houses are too dangerous to even try to retrieve belongings. Andrea Hsu, NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu, NPR

In the Lower Ninth ward, the collapsing houses are too dangerous to even try to retrieve belongings.

Andrea Hsu, NPR

Six months after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans is a city of revelry —- and a city of despair. A city where some neighborhoods are up and running, and others are a wasteland. A city where some have found a new calling, and some can no longer cope. Robert Siegel and Michele Norris report from New Orleans.

This report was produced by Andrea Hsu.