Zulu Krewe Loves a Parade

Ike Wheeler, Larry Hammond and Charles Hamilton (left to right) are Zulu's co-captions this year. i i

Ike Wheeler, Larry Hammond and Charles Hamilton (left to right) are Zulu's co-captions this year. Cheryl Gerber hide caption

itoggle caption Cheryl Gerber
Ike Wheeler, Larry Hammond and Charles Hamilton (left to right) are Zulu's co-captions this year.

Ike Wheeler, Larry Hammond and Charles Hamilton (left to right) are Zulu's co-captions this year.

Cheryl Gerber
The Zulu coconuts, which are the prized 'throws' of Zulu, hand-painted by the members. i i

The Zulu coconuts, which are the prized 'throws' of Zulu, hand-painted by the members. Cheryl Gerber hide caption

itoggle caption Cheryl Gerber
The Zulu coconuts, which are the prized 'throws' of Zulu, hand-painted by the members.

The Zulu coconuts, which are the prized 'throws' of Zulu, hand-painted by the members.

Cheryl Gerber

New Orleans Diary

The Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club is the oldest mostly-black krewe in New Orleans' Mardi Gras parade. They're at the head of the procession this year amid recovery from Hurricane Katrina.

Coming back wasn't a completely controversy-free decision. Many members lost homes and incomes, but Keith Doley, a second generation Zulu who lost his home, said the membership made the right decision, for this year and for history.

"It was very important," Doley says. "Zulu starts Mardi Gras morning. We set the tempo."

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