The Bordelons and Ronald Lewis: Mardi Gras Update Steve Inskeep checks in with some New Orleans residents with whom he has been in touch since Hurricane Katrina hit. The Bordelon family lives in St. Bernard Parish. Ronald Lewis is the president of a Ninth Ward social club.
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The Bordelons and Ronald Lewis: Mardi Gras Update

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The Bordelons and Ronald Lewis: Mardi Gras Update

The Bordelons and Ronald Lewis: Mardi Gras Update

The Bordelons and Ronald Lewis: Mardi Gras Update

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5242084/5242184" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Donald and Colleen Bordelon pose for a photo this past February. Bruce Auster, NPR hide caption

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Bruce Auster, NPR

Donald and Colleen Bordelon pose for a photo this past February.

Bruce Auster, NPR

Mardi Gras this year was not altogether different for some residents of New Orleans, despite the obvious change in landscape after Hurricane Katrina. Donald and Colleen Bordelon of St. Bernard Parish watched parades on TV, as they did last year — but they also spent a lot of time working on their flood-damaged home.

In the adjacent Ninth Ward, Ronald Lewis talked of a lively celebration; but he also talked about the fact that many residents in the neighborhood still have no electricity. "Rebuild the Nine, turn on the lights, and we'll come back," he says.

Steve Inskeep has been in touch with Lewis and the Bordelons, separately, since last October. He connects the three for a conversation about their respective situations. They also discuss a rumor that the Bordelons' neighborhood is slated to be turned into green space. "I don't want to leave St. Bernard," Donald says with emotion. "I love it here."

A follow-up investigation finds that the flow of misinformation is abundant about the future of certain neighborhoods after Katrina, but the future remains uncertain enough to justify the Bordelons' worry.

Conversations: The Bordelons