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President Bush Touts India as an Opportunity

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President Bush Touts India as an Opportunity

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President Bush Touts India as an Opportunity

President Bush Touts India as an Opportunity

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An Indian protester performs a street drama on Friday during a demonstration against President George W. Bush in Hyderabad. Five people were injured in clashes between police and Muslims protesting the visit. Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images

An Indian protester performs a street drama on Friday during a demonstration against President George W. Bush in Hyderabad. Five people were injured in clashes between police and Muslims protesting the visit.

Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images

Can India become a key export market instead of a place where U.S. companies send jobs? On a visit to the Indian School of Business in the southern city of Hyderabad, President Bush highlights trade opportunities with a nation of more than 1 billion people.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

President Bush's visit to India brought him to one of the major economies of the future. It's already affecting the American economy. Outsourcing takes many jobs there, and today the president met entrepreneurs in a southern Indian city. Hyderabad is known as India's technological center and it's where the president urged Americans to think of India as an opportunity.

NPR's Don Gonyea reports from New Delhi.

DON GONYEA, reporting:

On his second and final day in India, the president was promoting trade. He toured a university that's specializes in agriculture and which is working to modernize that industry here. And in Hyderabad, a normally crowded and bustling place that was virtually shut down for security reasons during the presidential visit, Mr. Bush spoke to students at a business school, but he seemed to be talking to an audience back home in the U.S.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: America ought to look at India as a strategic partner in keeping the peace; a great democracy which is capable of having people from different religions living side by side in peace and harmony; and a wonderful opportunity to, with whom to trade.

GONYEA: As for the loss of American jobs in computer and information technology because of outsourcing to India, the president said there are two ways to look at that problem.

President BUSH: One is to say, losing jobs is painful, therefore, let's throw up protectionist laws, and the other is to say, losing jobs is painful, so let's make sure people are educated so they can find the--fill the jobs of the 21st century.

GONYEA: Also today in New Delhi, the president delivers what's being billed as the keynote speech of this trip; he's expected to talk about what he sees as shared values between the U.S. and India, which is the world's largest democracy.

Don Gonyea, NPR News, New Delhi.

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