NPR logo

Voices in the News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5246098/5246099" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Voices in the News

News

Voices in the News

Voices in the News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5246098/5246099" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including: Mardi Gras in New Orleans; jazz musician Kermit Ruffins; Amar Magget of Najaf; Said Fuwad Al-Grabi of Najaf; President Bush; Sakhaf of New Delhi; Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh; Rep. Edward Makey (D-MA); Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen. And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Mr. KERMIT RUFFINS (Jazz Musician, Mardi Gras, New Orleans): We're the type of people that are always looking for a reason to party and now we have the biggest reason ever. Every time you open up a restaurant, we're going to party. Every time they open up a church, we're going to party. Every time they open up a school, we're going to have a band play. Imagine all those kids marching in the Mardi Gras parade and all of them are being influenced by jazz players. And that will never, ever stop.

Mr. AMAR MAGGET (Najaf): (Through Translator) The Americans came for their own interests. If the Americans were to leave, everything would be fine. They're behind all the country's problems.

Mr. SAID FUWAD AL-GRABI (Najaf): (Through Translator) What are you talking about? If America leaves now, the Baathists will come back. True, we don't want the Americans, but they need to control security before they leave.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: America ought to look at India as a strategic partner in keeping the peace, a great democracy which is capable of having people from different religions live side by side in peace and harmony, and a wonderful opportunity to with whom to trade.

Mr. SAKHAF (New Delhi, India): Well, I think you know nothing could be more ironical than Bush visiting Gandhi because Gandhi was a spokesperson for non-violent politics of freedom, and Bush just believes in the opposite.

Prime Minister MARMOHAN SINGH (India): I'm particularly pleased that we have reached an understanding on the implementation of our agreement on civil nuclear cooperation of July 18, 2005.

Representative EDWARD MAKEY (Democrat, Massachusetts): This agreement allows India to be an oxymoron. Half weapons state, half civilian nuclear weapons state, without ever having signed a nuclear non-proliferation agreement.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: On my trip to Islamabad, I will meet with President Musharraf to discuss Pakistan's vital cooperation in the war on terror and our efforts to foster economic and political development so we can reduce the appeal of radical Islam.

President PERVEZ MUSHARRAF (Pakistan): Fighting extremism and terrorism is a moral imperative dictated by our own deeply cherished values and our vision of building a moderate and a very progressive society in Pakistan.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.