Beer Makes Surprise Appearance in the Plumbing Imagine going to your kitchen sink to rinse a bit of silverware, and out of the faucet comes beer. Haldis Gundersen of Norway told reporters she thought it was a "miracle." But it was a drag for the bar two floors below -- which was getting water from its beer taps. For Gundersen, turning water-to-beer was not much of a blessing; she said the beer was flat.
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Beer Makes Surprise Appearance in the Plumbing

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Beer Makes Surprise Appearance in the Plumbing

Beer Makes Surprise Appearance in the Plumbing

Beer Makes Surprise Appearance in the Plumbing

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5261450/5261451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Imagine going to your kitchen sink to rinse a bit of silverware, and out of the faucet comes beer. Haldis Gundersen of Norway told reporters she thought it was a "miracle." But it was a drag for the bar two floors below — which was getting water from its beer taps. For Gundersen, turning water-to-beer was not much of a blessing; she said the beer was flat.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. Imagine going to your kitchen sink to rinse a bit of silverware, and out comes beer. Haldis Gundersen of Norway told reporters she thought it was a miracle. It was a drag for the bar two floors below, which was getting water from its beer taps after someone accidentally switched the pipes. For Gundersen, turning water to beer turned out not to be much of a blessing--she said the beer was flat. Cheers. This is MORNING EDITION.

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