Author Interviews

Author Blythe Has a Ball with Duke-UNC Rivalry

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Detail from the cover of Will Blythe's book shows basketball embedded in a plaster wall.

Basketball: a love-hate relationship. hide caption

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In the world of college basketball... at least that ribbon of Atlantic Coast Conference territory that ties Durham to Chapel Hill, N.C... you are a Tar Heel fan or you are a Blue Devil fan. That is, you root for North Carolina (the defending national champion; Michael Jordan; Dean Smith; Tyler Hansbrough) or you root for Duke (this year's top-ranked team for most of the season; Grant Hill; Coach K; JJ Redick).

So when writer Will Blythe found his marriage over, his girlfriend not speaking to him and his income non-existent, he focused on his real problem: basketball.

The third-generation Heel wrestles with his obsession in To Hate Like This Is to be Happy Forever, his extremely personal account of the Dooooooook/Carolina-lina rivalry.

"I am a sick, sick man," he confesses, as the book opens. "Not only am I consumed by hatred, I am delighted by it..."

Blythe tells Debbie Elliott about living a life built around a bouncing ball.

Books Featured In This Story

To Hate Like This Is To Be Happy Forever

A Thoroughly Obsessive, Intermittently Uplifting, and Occasionally Unbiased Account of the Duke-North Carolina Basketball Rivalry

by Will Blythe

Hardcover, 357 pages |

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Title
To Hate Like This Is To Be Happy Forever
Subtitle
A Thoroughly Obsessive, Intermittently Uplifting, and Occasionally Unbiased Account of the Duke-North Carolina Basketball Rivalry
Author
Will Blythe

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