Historic Recordings Tell Clawhammer Banjo History

The Myers Brothers i i

hide captionThe Myers Brothers, Sidna (banjo) and Fulton (fiddle), on their porch, Hillsville, Va., 1967.

Charlie Faurot/Courtesy Lynch Graphics Inc.
The Myers Brothers

The Myers Brothers, Sidna (banjo) and Fulton (fiddle), on their porch, Hillsville, Va., 1967.

Charlie Faurot/Courtesy Lynch Graphics Inc.

Forty years ago, a young man named Charles Faurot traveled from New York City to southwestern Virginia looking for older traditional banjo players to record for a tiny country-music record label. He found them and eventually produced three LPs of raw, intense mountain music.

The records became the subjects of near cult-like devotion among a generation of younger players from around the world. One of them was NPR newscaster and reporter Paul Brown. The records are back out, on CD, with additional tracks.

Listening to them again, Brown found himself swept away by their brilliance. And he decided, at long last, to find Charles Faurot, and hear the story of the making of Clawhammer Banjo, Vols. 1-3.

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