David Seymour's 'Reflections From The Heart'

David Seymour

David Seymour co-founded Magnum, the elite photojournalism agency, in 1947 with a group that included Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Capa. Seymour died covering the Suez crisis in 1956. Elliott Erwitt hide caption

itoggle caption Elliott Erwitt

David Seymour chronicled wars and the lives they shattered from the 1930s to 1950s. In the process, the photographer, who went by the nickname Chim, somehow found a way to get close enough to capture the spirit — and hope — in his subjects.

"If you look at many of Chim's photos, and ask yourself what happened in the 3 minutes before that photo was taken, you'll mostly come to the conclusion that he made a personal relationship with these people," says Seymour's nephew, Ben Shneiderman, who contributed to an exhibit of Seymour's works currently at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

"He didn't surprise them, he didn't photograph them from a distance or over their shoulders...," Shneiderman says. "He made a close, personal and emotional relationship."

'Reflections from the Heart': Photographs by Chim

Selections from the David Seymour (Chim) exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., through June 4, 2006.

'Woman at Land Distribution Meeting'

Woman at Land Distribution Meeting, Estremadura, Spain, 1936 Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/The Photography Collections, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Gift of Ben Shneiderman hide caption

itoggle caption Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/The Photography Collections, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Gift of Ben Shneiderman
'Children Playing with a Broken Doll'

Children Playing with a Broken Doll, Naples, Italy, 1948 Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Gift of Ben Shneiderman hide caption

itoggle caption Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Gift of Ben Shneiderman
'Blind Boy, Who Lost His Arms in the War, Reading with His Lips'

Blind Boy, Who Lost His Arms in the War, Reading with His Lips, Rome, Italy, 1948 Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos hide caption

itoggle caption Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos
'Terezka, a Child in a Center for Disturbed Children, Produced These Scrawls as a Picture of Home'

Terezka, a Child in a Center for Disturbed Children, Produced These Scrawls as a Picture of Home, Poland, 1948 Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Gift of Ben Shneiderman hide caption

itoggle caption Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Gift of Ben Shneiderman
'First Child Born in Alma, Israel'

First Child Born in Alma, Israel, 1951 Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Gift of Ben Shneiderman hide caption

itoggle caption Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Gift of Ben Shneiderman
Sophia Loren (at 19), 1953

Sophia Loren (at 19), 1953 Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/Courtesy of Ben Shneiderman hide caption

itoggle caption Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/Courtesy of Ben Shneiderman
'Arturo Toscanini in his Library, with Death Masks of Beethoven, Wagner and Verdi'

Arturo Toscanini in his Library, with Death Masks of Beethoven, Wagner and Verdi, Milan, Italy, 1954 Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/The Photography Collections, University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Gift of Ben Shneiderman hide caption

itoggle caption Copyright David "Chim" Seymour/Magnum Photos/The Photography Collections, University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Gift of Ben Shneiderman

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