Chicken Stuffing is Million-Dollar Idea

Anna Ginsberg had no idea when she tried using frozen waffles as stuffing for chicken that she'd get a million dollars for the recipe. The Austin, Texas, woman says she's still shocked that her name was called out as this year's Pillsbury Bake-Off winner.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

A stay at home mom from Austin, Texas, just got matched up with a million dollars. She won a grand prize at the 42nd Pillsbury Bake-Off. The contestants cooked, boiled, and baked in a five-hour competition in Orlando. They competed for big money in categories like Simple Snacks and Dinner Made Easy. Only one talented chef would walk away a millionaire. And that prize went to the creator of a mean baked chicken recipe.

Ms. ANNA GINSBERG (Winner, 42nd Pillsbury Bake-Off): I was stunned, and it didn't seem real.

MONTAGNE: Anna Ginsberg cooked a baked chicken and spinach stuffing with a devilish twist. The stuffing is made of chopped and sautéed frozen waffle sticks, using the including syrup as a glaze for the chicken.

Ms. GINSBERG: And in the spinach, I had to use another product for the contest. So, I think well, I'll go ahead and add some spinach to it. And I used Green Giant Spinach. So, I knew I had a Pillsbury winner.

MONTAGNE: Green Giant, of course, being a Pillsbury product. Anna Ginsberg competed in the Dinner for Two category. She beat out 96 women and three men for the grand prize. She's planning to put most of the million dollars away for her daughter's college education, and take some family vacations this summer.

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