Israel Could See Lowest Voter Turnout in 20 Years

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Avigdor Lieberman, leader of Yisrael Beitenu (Israel Our Home) i

Avigdor Lieberman, leader of Yisrael Beitenu (Israel Our Home), the far right-wing party based among immigrants from the former Soviet Union, in his Jerusalem office, March 26, 2006. Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Getty Images/Getty Images
Avigdor Lieberman, leader of Yisrael Beitenu (Israel Our Home)

Avigdor Lieberman, leader of Yisrael Beitenu (Israel Our Home), the far right-wing party based among immigrants from the former Soviet Union, in his Jerusalem office, March 26, 2006.

Getty Images/Getty Images

The day before the Israeli election, more than 20 percent of the public haven't decided who to vote for. A lackluster campaign has failed to energize the public, and voter turnout may be the lowest in 20 years. But a new force in the election, Russian-born Avigdor Lieberman, could change the political landscape.

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