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The Vanishing Craft of the Typewriter Repairman

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The Vanishing Craft of the Typewriter Repairman

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The Vanishing Craft of the Typewriter Repairman

The Vanishing Craft of the Typewriter Repairman

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Paul Schweitzer runs the Gramercy Typewriter Co., a Manhattan business started by his father in the 1930s. Margot Adler, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Margot Adler, NPR

Some people still write with fountain pens. Some still love their old manual and electric typewriters. But typewriter repairmen are a vanishing breed. Up on the eighth floor of the Flatiron Building in Manhattan, Paul Schweitzer has been fixing and cleaning typewriters for 40 years.

Schweitzer's father began the business during the Depression. Today, manual and electronic typewriters of all shapes, colors and sizes fill Schweitzer's tiny workshop. He spends most of the day making house calls around the city, carrying a tool bag that doesn't look so different from the old doctor's bag.

Listen to an interview with Richard Polt, a professor of philosophy at Xavier University in Cincinnati and collector of typewriters.

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