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Tissue Engineering and Bionics

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Tissue Engineering and Bionics

Tissue Engineering and Bionics

Tissue Engineering and Bionics

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Doctors have created bladders in a lab, using living cells taken from patients. The lab-made bladders were then implanted into patients suffering from poor bladder function. Ira Flatow leads a discussion on tissue engineering. How close are scientists to making other organs to order, or getting limbs to regrow?

Guests:

Stephen Badylak, research professor, Dept. of Surgery; director, pre-clinical tissue engineering, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh.

Michael Lysaght, professor, medical science and engineering; director, Center for Biomedical Engineering; Brown University.

William Craelius, professor, biomedical engineering, Rutgers University.

Daniel Palanker, assistant professor, Dept. of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University.

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