Revisionist Religious History

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Religious news this week is challenging some preconceptions. Two in particular: a theory that Jesus may have been walking on ice, not water... and the much-publicized unveiling of an ancient text that could revise the image of Judas.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Lots of religious news this week to challenge some preconceptions. Professor Doron Nof, an oceanographer at Florida State University, says that salty springs feeding the Sea of Galilee could've isolated patches of the surface that froze during a cold spell, enabling Jesus of Nazareth to appear to walk on water, which was actually ice. Then there's announcement of the text of the Gospel of Judas has been translated in which Jesus refers to Judas as his most trusted apostle and asks Judas to betray him to Roman authorities. If this had been known earlier, imagine how many young boys might be named Judas today.

And finally, Indian director T. Rajeevnath thinks that he's found the right young celebrity to portray Mother Teresa in the film biography he's planning. Paris Hilton. The director says that Ms. Hilton bears a close facial resemblance to the young nun Agnes Bojaxhiu, who would become Mother Teresa. You know, when I saw that video I thought I noticed the resemblance.

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