Polls Against Berlusconi as Italians Vote

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Prodi supporters wear T-shirts that say 'I'm a Moron.' i

Prodi supporters wear T-shirts that, loosely translated, proclaim: "I'm a moron." Berlusconi used a vulgar term that equates to moron to describe anyone who could vote for his rival. Sylvia Poggioli, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Sylvia Poggioli, NPR
Prodi supporters wear T-shirts that say 'I'm a Moron.'

Prodi supporters wear T-shirts that, loosely translated, proclaim: "I'm a moron." Berlusconi used a vulgar term that equates to moron to describe anyone who could vote for his rival.

Sylvia Poggioli, NPR
A Berlusconi supporter waves a huge flag. i

A Berlusconi supporter waves a huge flag proclaiming her allegiance to the prime minister. Sylvia Poggioli, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Sylvia Poggioli, NPR
A Berlusconi supporter waves a huge flag.

A Berlusconi supporter waves a huge flag proclaiming her allegiance to the prime minister.

Sylvia Poggioli, NPR

Italians vote Sunday and Monday in what is seen as a referendum on the conservative government of their prime minister, the media tycoon-turned-politican Silvio Berlusconi.

His chief rival — leading in the polls — is softspoken Romano Prodi, former European Union commissioner and also a former prime minister. Prodi heads a center-left coalition. The campaign has been tense and strident. Results are expected Monday night.

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